Hundreds of people gathered together to march for march for women's equality. Marchers wait to cross Bemidji Ave, and head down to the Rail River Folk School where the festivities continued. Photo by Shawn Campbell.

Hundreds of people gathered together to march for march for women’s equality. Marchers wait to cross Bemidji Ave, and head down to the Rail River Folk School where the festivities continued. Photo by Shawn Campbell.

By Andy Kucera and Shawn Campbell

Pat Broker a local community activist is striving for real change. She believes that the turmoil in our country lately is an opportunity for people to stand up and fight to make a difference. Photo by Andy Kucera.

Pat Broker a local community activist is striving for real change. She believes that the turmoil in our country lately is an opportunity for people to stand up and fight to make a difference. Photo by Andy Kucera.

The Women’s March on Washington on Jan. 21 brought people together as crowds across the nation marched through the streets with numbers exceeding expectations. All across the United States men, women and children marched. Some republicans, some democrats, all advocates for change.
In St. Paul, it was estimated that between 90,000 and 100,000 people attended the march. While in Bemidji, though there is no official number, the crowd continued to grow with many people ecstatic with the turnout. The reason people marched varied, but the general consensus was that everyone was marching for a their own reasons.

William Hartwell of Bemidji, MN hopes progress will continue to improve human rights issue. He was astounded by the number of people who attended the march, and is very proud of his town coming together for change. Photo by Shawn Campbell.

William Hartwell of Bemidji, MN hopes progress will continue to improve human rights issue. He was astounded by the number of people who attended the march, and is very proud of his town coming together for change. Photo by Shawn Campbell.

“It shows how important human rights are,” said William Hartwell of Bemidji, an attendee who marched at the event for healthcare for all, “I was raised in the middle of the Vietnam era, so I’ve had to stand up and speak out against injustice since I was 16 years old.”

Tia Hinz, a student at Bemidji State University, worked behind the scenes on the women’s march said, “I think it’s really cool to see all these people coming together. It’s not just democrats, it’s not just women it’s everyone and I think that’s really cool.”

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